conference

What I Wish Someone Told Me Before My First Trip To Magento Imagine - 2015 Edition

Are you headed to the Magento Imagine conference in April? If so, you might want to check out what ended up being my most popular article of 2014 - What I Wish Someone Told Me Before My First Trip to Magento Imagine. A majority of that article is still relevant for #ImagineCommerce 2015, with a few tweaks and new hints:

  1. Imagine 2015 is back to its usual spot on the calendar in April instead of May. That means it won't be quite as hot, but Vegas still averages a high of 80 F and a low of about 60 F during that week of April each year. It's entirely possible it will be even warmer than that - as I write this, the forecast for the next week for Vegas has highs as high as 91 F. The evening events will be cooler this year than last year, though, from the looks of things.
  2. I just want to really emphasize what my original article says about how quickly Imagine passes by. If you see someone you've always wanted to talk to - stop, and talk to them. Even if you miss a session, do it, because before you know it Imagine will be over and we'll all be headed back home. There's several people I wanted to talk to last year that I just didn't get a chance to because I said "I'll catch up with them tomorrow"
  3. Don't assume you have to go to every single session to get the most value out of Imagine. Doing so may leave you exhausted, overwhelmed and missing out on some of the best conversations that are held in the hallways, on the casino floor and throughout the hotel.
  4. This year's event is at the Wynn. The Wynn has a great location on the Las Vegas Strip - across the street from Fashion Show Mall, and at the same intersection as Treasure Island, the Mirage and the Venetian. If you time it right, you can walk down to the Bellagio (a bit less than a mile from the Wynn) and see the fountain show there, then walk back towards the Wynn and catch the volcano at the Mirage on your way back, along with seeing a number of the great Vegas casinos on your way.
  5. The official hashtag this year is #ImagineCommerce. Also, a number of Magento community members now use the hashtag #realmagento instead of #magento due to the amount of spam that occurs on the #magento hashtag.
  6. Speaking of hashtags - some of the greatest unplanned, spontaneous happenings at Imagine are organized on Twitter. Even if you never tweet, keep an eye on the #ImagineCommerce hashtag or follow me on Twitter - @JoshuaSWarren - and stay in the loop with what's going on at Imagine.
  7. A number of community members have written their own guides to Imagine. If you've written one, send me the link on Twitter and I'll post it here. So far, I recommend starting with the 'Taking Advantage - Magento Imagine' article by Karen from WebShopApps.
  8. If you haven't already, go back and read last year's article - What I Wish Someone Told Me Before My First Trip to Magento Imagine - it has even more great tips for your trip to Imagine.

I'm looking forward to seeing old friends and making new ones at Imagine this year. If you see me at the conference, please don't hesitate to say hi! Don't worry if it seems weird to introduce yourself to someone you follow on Twitter but have never met; I've gotten very used to people saying "Hi, Josh! I follow you on Twitter!".

Making Magento go fast by Thijs Feryn @ThijsFeryn at #phpworld

Making Magento go fast by Thijs Feryn @ThijsFeryn at #phpworld Magento can be a little slow, but it's tremendously flexible.

Presenting today from the perspective of a hosting company employee who knows a lot about PHP but not a lot about Magento and approached it from a hosting/operational standpoint.

Remember the basics - activate caching, flat catalogs and JS & CSS minifcation.

The Magento compiler is a lie - it's invented for people who have no bytecode caching, but everyone should have that now.

Magento cache by default is on the disk - var/cache/

Move the Magento cache to somewhere faster. Could try APC or memcached. Memcached support allows multiple servers.

Magento uses a 2-level cache, a fast backend (adapter) and slow backend (disk).

You can put your slow backend (var/cache)on tmpfs.

PHP is slow - especially the older versions.

Remember - many types of PHP caching doesn't work well with fast-cgi because everything is in multiple, separate processes. Every process has its own APC cache.

With php-fpm you can configure a master process that stores the byte code cache so each child process uses same cache.

Opcache is awesome and a lot faster than APC.

Get all of your caches in memory!

The database is important for Magento performance - give MySQL more RAM. MySQL should use 80% of your database server's memory.

If you have lots of traffic to Magento, try turning off query caching and use the memory for the buffer pool and other uses in MySQL.

Check the setting innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit - try to change it to 2 or 0.

Setup 2 database servers - one for reads, and one for writes.

Redis is GREAT - use it! Redis has built-in deplication, multiple data types, doesn't require a 2-level cache.

Store your sessions in redis so that sessions are shared between all of your web nodes.

Varnish is fast and scales - sites have powered 40 million users per day with only 2 Varnish servers.

Varnish only works on static items - product catalog and CMS pages. Not on checkout. It's great for static content, but it doesn't have SSL support. You have to terminate SSL before it gets to Varnish - use something like haproxy or nginix.

Look at using Turpentine - it allows you to use ESI or AJAX with Varnish and Magento.

If you can't use Varnish, use Lesti FPC.

If you're using Varnish or LestiFPC, turn off the visitor log tables, because they are no longer accurate. Convert them to blackhole tables.

Magento's default search can be a full-text search on the database - replace this with something better. Try using elasticsearch.

Host static files separately on a CDN.

Use Redis "clustering" to remove Redis as a single point of failure. Try Redis-cluster or Redis Sentinel - there's a Redis Sentinel patch for Cm_Cache_Backend_Rails.

 

phpworld keynote: Turning Your Code into a Company: The Parts They Don't Tell You by Luke Stokes

Turning Your Code into a Company: The Parts They Don't Tell You by Luke Stokes - @lukestokes. Founder, CTO of Foxycart. Founded in 2007. Goal was to provide income for his growing family.

Starting a company is hard - it took 4 years of working full-time and then building Foxycart in the evenings and on the weekends, working as much as 10 hours on Saturdays. Don't believe the hype on TV - Shark Tank isn't real life. It's hard to build a company. But it's worth it!

A human being should benefit from what you do as a developer.

There's no such thing as an overnight success.

Getting "funded" is not a destination.

Build a business, not a startup.

Think about what do you believe - what will keep you motivated at 2AM?

Your focus has to be about the customer.

Belief that commerce technology makes the world a better place kept Luke going as he built FoxyCart.

Coders are insecure - we have a habit of hiding our code away. Don't be! Every failure is a step closer to success.

As a developer: solve problems, add value, keep learning.

Listen to your customers!

Motivation - passion is required, but it isn't enough. Who will talk you off the ledge? Think about paying customers. Encourage each other.

There's no glamour at 2AM - building a business is hard.

Solve real problems - if you'd pay for it, others might also.

How did Luke get to where he is with Foxy cart: slow and steady, grow the team with awesome people, focus on the product.

Focus on the product. Build a solid development team, not a sales or marketing team early on.

Fear can be healthy - don't make the jump to full time with your new company until revenue is a nice, consistent positive number.

There's great tools out there to help you build your company now. Check out http://bit.ly/foxytools for some recommendations.

php[world] opening remarks

Eli is opening up php[world] with the opening remarks. Welcome to the first PHP[WORLD]!

The goal is to bring the entire PHP community together.

Get out there and talk to people from other platforms/communities that are here today.

Twitter hashtag is #phpworld

WiFi is Sheraton_Conference, user: php14, password: sheraton14

Game night tonight, open source hackathon tomorrow night.

Open spaces - sign up for a slot. You don't have to be an expert on the topic, just talk about something you're interested in.

Please use join.in - https://joind.in/event/phpworld - provide feedback on all of the talks.

Visit the User Group Alley to learn more about some of the user groups that are represented here.

 

Beyond the Blinders: Unseen Opportunities in SEO Meet Magento New York 2014 Talk

This Meet Magento New York 2014 talk is "Beyond the Blinders: Unseen Opportunities in SEO" by Seth Dotterer. Search has fundamentally changed how consumers consume and how marketers market.

The average US adult now spends half their time online. Online is pulling attention span from TV, radio and print media.

Buyers are revolting against traditional marketing channels.

Web consumers choose organic content - no one is clicking on banner ads, and most click on organic, not paid search results.

1 out of every 2 consumers say they don't trust ads.

Great marketers engage early - get people at the awareness and exploration stages, don't just focus on targeting at the purchase point.

Many consumers now start their shopping experience by researching on Pinterest.

Customers strongly prefer the unpaid web. 90% of search budgets are going to 6% of the traffic.

Manage your content across all unpaid channels - Google, YouTube, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, etc.

Stop crowding the register (that's what everyone is doing, and you don't have their budget) - don't target people at the buying stage - back up and target them before they're ready to buy.